Master Your Message Blog

Closing

Newbie speakers get a little apprehensive about questions. There’s a fear that they’ll be caught off guard – that they’ll look stupid if they don’t have an answer . . .

And they’re right … if they’re unprepared. Just like anything else in life, looking brilliant on stage takes planning.

However, if you really do know your material, prepare properly, and follow a few basic rules, you’ll find it’s the most powerful part of a presentation.

I love question and answer sessions

I love Question and Answer sessions. ‘Cause they give me a chance to shine – I can carry on a direct dialogue with my audience and make sure any concerns are addressed.

Here’s what you do. Know your subject area and identify any potential questions that might be sensitive Read More …

presentation-small-webHere are the remaining four keys to getting what you want. Use them every time you present and be more successful!

3. Be crystal clear when you ask for what you want—what does success look like? 

I really learned this lesson as speaker/trainer for National Seminars (the largest public seminar company in the US). As part of the program, we would offer pertinent resources (books, DVDs, etc) that participants could buy as a reduced rate during the session.

I’m a huge proponent of reading and owning lots of book so that you have good, solid, well-researched information on hand when you need it. The other concern, of course is that as soon as participants in the seminar leave the room, all but the key points Read More …

presentation-small-webThere are a number of reasons presenters get frustrated with their results. The most common is not getting the response they want. They spend hours putting together all the pertinent information, support it all with gorgeous visuals, work on their performance, and get what seems to be an energetic, positive response from the audience.

But … “no cigar,”as they say. They don’t win the project, make the sale, or get the action they want at the end of their talk.

It could be the structure of without a doubt, the most important part of the presentation—the closing (or “asking for the order”). If you don’t get this right, it really doesn’t matter how the other 98% of your presentation went!

So, let’s take a look Read More …

At a talk I gave last week on presentation structure (it was a little more exciting than it sounds!), I got asked a fabulous question during a break by one of the students in the audience.

She was preparing a presentation to a government body and wanted them to take action on an issue regarding immigration policies. She wanted them to change their policies — that was it. That was the intended action she was going to ask for.

Imagine if you were asked to change something you were doing that infringed on someone else’s rights, or was simply a workplace improvement. If you were left to try to figure out an appropriate action, you likely wouldn’t move forward with any great amount of gusto. Read More …