Master Your Message Blog

imagination

Here’s my third rule relating back to my cover article of earlier this week.

We make decisions based on emotion and justify them based on facts.

The majority of people don’t buy a car based upon how economically it will get them from A to B. It’s usually something else … like the most new gizmos, the color, the speed … or just the way it makes them feel. If they can imagine themselves enjoying driving that particular car, the sale is made.

We buy most items based on emotion, not logic.

Imagine taking this little baby for a spin!

Even in the corporate environment, emotion is most often the factor that will sway your audience. How they feel about the information presented will likely be the deciding factor as to how they Read More …

Here’s my second rule relating back to my cover article of earlier this week.

Visuals can sometimes detract from the emotional substance of your talk. For example, real emotional impact comes from the use of your audience’s imagination. The more concrete you make an image on a screen, the less it “belongs” to your audience. It’s your image, not theirs. They don’t “own” the image because they’re not emotionally connected to it.

In the 1930s, radio plays were today’s film blockbusters. They drew far greater audiences than any other format – “radio for the mind.” You would listen so intently as actors portrayed scenes so vividly written that you were completely drawn in. Sound effects helped make them “mind candy.” Talk about engaged!

You Read More …

Here’s my first rule relating back to my cover article of earlier this week.

We don’t think in words; we think in pictures. It’s images that engage minds.

Painting from cave man daysThink back to caveman days (not personal memories—although it’s been suggested I could relate my own stories of that era—but rather what you know about how they communicated). The walls of their caves were filled with rudimentary visual images of their exploits. They shared stories in pictures.

Of course, they hadn’t invented language yet and so this was the only means they had to share their knowledge. But language is only a set of symbols that represent pictures in our mind.

Take this example: If I were to ask you to think of an “ice cream Read More …