Master Your Message Blog

powerful

There is nothing quite like a beautiful body. Perfect form and an end that sells the whole package.

Hey, I’m talking about presentations!

Your presentation can take a number of different forms. You’ll find a list of the most common ones here. For more in-depth information and examples of how to use them, you’ll have to take my online, self-paced video course, Persuasive Presentations 2.0.

Persuasive presentations always have a strong open and close – they’re the most important parts of your presentation … but the middle of your presentation is called “the body” and it has to be “just right.” It’s where you get the chance to really be persuasive.

The body is where you make your key points. And the beauty Read More …

Dr. Martin Luther King speaking, "I Have a Dream"The key to having impact with your persuasive presentation is practicing the Rule of One.

The rule of one is simple. If your presentation is about more than one thing, you’re wasting your time. Nobody will ever remember what it was about. I’m serious!

Let’s say you did a half-hour presentation starting at five o’clock in the afternoon. You finish at 5:30. Surveys show that at 6 o’clock, a half hour after you’ve finished, your audience will remember a mere 50% of your content.

Next morning … when you get to the office, ask around and you’ll find that most remember 25%. A week later, if you were to do the same survey, the result would be 10%.

This is a great example Read More …

This is for those of us who have sat through a persuasive presentation and wondered, “What on earth is this about?”

I haven’t actually counted, but it seems to me that it happens more than fifty percent of the time. I don’t know where the speaker is going. The flow of the presentation is off – it’s not logical.

More often than not, the speakers forgets to tell us what the presentation is about … they just launch into the middle of it.

Or sometimes, they start with a big, long story … but we have no idea where it’s leading … sometimes, even at the end of it!

There’s a really simple way of thinking about the flow. It’s the secret to crafting really Read More …

Using video in your presentation is easy. But you need to check your software manual or help files to find out what kinds of video you can use. You’ll find a list on my website for the various flavours of PowerPoint and Keynote.

But here’s what I want to talk about – etiquette. Because you can’t just throw up a twenty minute video and expect your job to be done and the audience to think you’re the greatest think since Cecil B. DeMille. There are unwritten rules to using video in your presentations.

This article and video will give you tips and techniques to ensure you use video as effectively as possible if you’re planning on using it in either PowerPoint or Keynote.

Keep your Read More …

We buy most items based on emotion, not logic.Don’t forget about emotion in your presentation. “What … in a business presentation?” you ask …

Ah … yup.

We make decisions based on our emotions all the time.
We justify them based on facts – on logic.

For example, the majority of people don’t buy a car based upon how economically it will get them from A to B. It’s usually something else … like the most new gizmos, the colour, the speed … or just the way it makes them feel. But when you ask them, they’ll typically tell you how practical it is …

You just have to look at advertising to see how important emotion is to the sale. Kids and animals sell. Sex sells. And status … keeping up with Read More …

Screen layout is really important to getting your message across.

Our eyes go to the lightest part of the frameTake this screen. Where does your eye go? Most people would say … to the brightest part of the background.

For me, the brightest part of the frame is the back of that lady’s head. In other words, the lightest object on the screen grabs your attention.

My frame of reference for light and its affect on us is television, film, and theatre. I’ve spent decades working across those areas. What I’ve learned is that our eyes are attracted by light, so put more light on the most important elements to make them brighter. Put less light on the unimportant information.

You need to think like that when you design your slides. It’s why light Read More …

Ever heard someone at the lectern read a speech? I mean a dull, boring, lifeless verbalization of just what’s on the paper in front of them, without any attempt to embellish it whatso ever or bring it to life?

My guess is probably … more often than you’d like to admit. And what does it do for you? Probably not much. It’s forgettable, right?

Well, it doesn’t need to be that way.

speech script marked with lines and slashes

In the world of professional narrators lives the marked script. Now, narrators are people who make very lucrative livings off their ability to read a script in front of a microphone naturally.

To do that, they mark up their scripts. A vertical line is a full pause. An underlined word is emphasized. It’s Read More …

This is right up there with the most important things I’ll ever tell you about persuasive presentations:

To be a successful persuasive presenter, you absolutely have to believe in your message. And you have to display passion.

Being persuasive requires understanding the audience

Mehrabian’s chart

You may have seen this pie chart before. It’s usually misinterpreted.

It comes from the work of Albert Mehrabian, Ph.D. He was measuring what happens when someone you know gives you mixed messages.

That’s like me telling you that “The weather’s not very good but I know you’re going to have great vacation” and saying it with a slight look of doubt on my face. You won’t hear anything about “great vacation.” My look of doubt reinforces the fact that the weather isn’t very good and, Read More …

They say you should rehearse an hour for every minute of your speech. I’m not so sure.

I think rehearsing your talk is really important. But how you do it, probably differs by individual.

There’s a belief out there about saying it in front of a mirror. What’s THAT about? Forget it – it doesn’t work.

What I do is break down longer talks into chunks – subtopics or key points. I get the main point in my mind and then I write down a word or two on a cue card. I memorize or think through the logic of the argument I’m going to make so that a key word will trigger that chunk.

Memorizing your entire speech is about the worst thing you Read More …

There is one word that’s the most important word in any persuasive presentation: You.

If my speech or presentation is about me, it may have interest, if it’s a good story, but if it’s about you … out there in the audience … there is nothing more interesting on earth! To you at least! Right?

Right!

Your presentation belongs to your audienceThe most important thing I learned on my journey to speaking professionally is that my presentation belongs to my audience. Now, I might have personal stories to illustrate a point, but the point has to relate to my audience … you. It has to, to be of interest and for me to be successful.

In fact, the objective of any talk has to center on your audience. If you’re Read More …