Master Your Message Blog

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If you want your audience to remember something, say it again … and again … and again.

Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous speech of March 28, 1863 stays with us today … at least the title does … “I Have A Dream.” Now, how many times did he say that line?
 Right … Eight! Eight times with intervals in between. Smart.

Speaking of smart: They’ve done experiments with students studying for tests. They had one group cram the night before and another group was shown the information in spaced intervals over a longer period of time. Who did better on the test?*

Right! Not the crammers. In fact, they did way worse.

Here’s the key. We learn the best when information is introduced in greater Read More …

Dr. Martin Luther King speaking, "I Have a Dream"The key to having impact with your persuasive presentation is practicing the Rule of One.

The rule of one is simple. If your presentation is about more than one thing, you’re wasting your time. Nobody will ever remember what it was about. I’m serious!

Let’s say you did a half-hour presentation starting at five o’clock in the afternoon. You finish at 5:30. Surveys show that at 6 o’clock, a half hour after you’ve finished, your audience will remember a mere 50% of your content.

Next morning … when you get to the office, ask around and you’ll find that most remember 25%. A week later, if you were to do the same survey, the result would be 10%.

This is a great example Read More …

mother-nature

Mother Nature

If you’re in any type of persuasive situation (presentation or not), you have to control the narrative—the story. Your story has to be the most compelling one. If you simply attack the existing narrative, your chances of winning are slim.

In sports, any team that plays only defense won’t win. You need to play offense, as well as defense. That’s a key lesson of sports.

I’ve been working with a group of scientists and engineers who are adamant about discrediting the current manmade warming theory. After all, it’s a scam and simply doesn’t survive any type of true analytical thinking. The solar system creates the climate on Earth and man is not in control of anything. Sorry!

Ask any astrophysicist.

But Read More …

audience-webNever in history have we been bombarded on a daily basis with so much information. Much of it comes in the form of distractions.

You know what I’m talking about: Emails, cell phones, texting; we’re bounced around all day long between one snippet of information and another.

Little work of any import happens in such an environment. But that’s reality for most of the workday. And it’s tiring. I don’t have to tell you that.

We’re bombarded with snippets of information hourly.

It’s no different in a presentation situation. You may think you have the attention of a cohesive group in an “out-of-the-line-of-fire” conference room, but it’s rarely “undivided.” Minds don’t automatically shut themselves off from outside issues when the eyes are focused on a lectern.

In order to have an impact, you have to capture the imagination. You must do it in a way that not only “sticks,” but lodges your message between the appropriate grey cells and resonates for a much longer period than the presentation itself (at the very least)!

Here are some basic principles to keep in mind when you create your next important presentation. Read More …

Imagine an opening statement that silences the room and locks every eye on you, the presenter. The audience is left figuratively “hanging,” staring at you, waiting for the next word.That’s the “riveting opening” – my favorite because it can be so powerful.It’s important to understand the role of opening lines.

1. They set the tone for the talk or session2. They communicate some of your personality3. They allow the audience to subconsciously judge you … and judge you they will!

“Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking,” the best-selling book by Malcolm Gladwell, is all about this last point. We humans judge situations, people, environments and virtually everything we come in contact with subconsciously all the time – in under 3 seconds and usually, Read More …